Archive for April 2010

FOCUS THIS WEEK!

24

Cancer-Related Illness: What Guru can teach the Black Community

Guru.
Image by Pieter Baert via Flickr

This is old news but what is older is the fact that we lead our white counter parts in another negative category. “African Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival rate of any other racial or ethnic group for most cancers,” according to the ACS web site. RIP Guru and let’s learn another lesson from the icon and get detected early!

The voice of music was quieted for a moment as millions mourned the loss of Guru, one half of the powerhouse group, Gangstarr. The New York MC, whose real name was Keith Elam, died at the age of 43 due to complications from undisclosed cancer after having been diagnosed with anoxia.

Producer Solar, who was a friend and collaborator of Guru’s, released a statement published in the report mourning the rapper’s death.

“The world has lost one of the best MCs and hip-hop icons of all-time—my loyal best friend, partner, and brother, Guru,” reads the statement issued by Solar. “Guru has been battling cancer for well over a year and has lost his battle! This is a matter that Guru wanted private until he could beat it, but tragically, this did not happen. The cancer took him. Now the world has lost a great man and a true genius.”

African Americans have the highest mortality rate of any racial and ethnic group for all cancers combined and for most major cancers. Death rates for all major causes of death are higher for African Americans than for whites, contributing to a lower life expectancy for both African American men and African American women.

  • In 2005, African American men were 1.3 times as likely to have new cases of lung and prostate cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  • African American men were twice as likely to have new cases of stomach cancer as non-Hispanic white men.
  • African Americans men had lower 5-year cancer survival rates for lung and pancreatic cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  • In 2006, African American men were 2.4 times as likely to die from prostate cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  • In 2005, African American women were 10% less likely to have been diagnosed with breast cancer, however, they were 34% more likely to die from breast cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white women.
  • African American women are twice as likely to have been diagnosed with stomach cancer, and they are 2.4 times as likely to die from stomach cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white women.

At a glance – New Cases:

New Cancer Cases per 100,000 – Men (2005)

Cancer

All Men

African
American
Men

Non-Hispanic
White Men

African
American/Non-
Hispanic White
Ratio

All Sites

510.1

587.6

538.0

1.1

Stomach

11.0

16.6

8.5

2.0

Lung

68.7

93.6

72.2

1.3

Prostate

147.1

220.3

145.3

1.5

Pancreas

13.0

16.8

13.0

1.3

Colon and Rectum

52.8

62.7

53.7

1.2


New Cancer Cases per 100,000 – Women (2005)

Cancer

All Women

African
American
Women

Non-Hispanic
White Women

African
American/Non-
Hispanic White
Ratio

All Sites

396.7

394.9

430.1

0.9

Stomach

5.5

7.7

3.6

2.1

Cervical

7.7

8.7

6.2

1.4

Pancreas

10.3

15.3

10.1

1.5

Colon and Rectum

40.3

51.4

40.6

1.3

Breast

121.5

113.9

133.6

0.9

Source:  CDC, 2009. Health United States, 2008. Table 52.
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus08.pdf [PDF | 12.2MB]

At a glance – Top Cancer Sites for African Americans (2002-2006):

Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – Men

Cancer

All Men

African
American
Men

Non-Hispanic
White Men

African
American/Non-
Hispanic White
Ratio

All Sites

541.8

633.7

544.3

1.2

Prostate

159.3

239.8

153.0

1.6

Lung & Bronchus

77.7

104.3

77.6

1.3

Colon & Rectum

57.3

69.3

56.9

1.2

Oral Cavity & Pharynx

15.4

16.7

15.6

1.1

Stomach

11.0

16.8

9.8

1.7

Kidney & Renal Pelvis

18.6

21.3

19.2

1.1

Pancreas

13.1

16.6

13.1

1.3

Esophagus

7.7

9.3

7.9

1.2

Liver & IBD

10.2

13.4

8.6

1.6

At a glance – Top Cancer Sites for African Americans (2002-2006):

Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – Women

Cancer

All Women

African
American
Women

Non-Hispanic
White Women

African
American/Non-
Hispanic White
Ratio

All Sites

408.5

398.9

420.5

0.9

Breast

123.8

117.7

127.8

0.9

Colon & Rectum

42.8

53.5

42.1

1.3

Lung & Bronchus

52.5

54.7

54.8

1.0

Pancreas

10.4

14.6

10.2

1.4

Cervical

8.2

10.4

8.1

1.3

Stomach

5.5

9.0

-

N/A

Kidney

9.5

10.3

9.9

1.0

Source:  NCI 2008.  Seer Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2006.  Tables 1.24 & 1.25
http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2006/results_merged/topic_inc_trends.pdf [PDF | 62KB]

At a glance – 5 Year Survival Rate:

Percent of Patients, Men (1996-2004)

Cancer

African American
Men

White Men

African
American/
White Ratio

All Sites

59.8

67.2

0.9

Stomach

22.6

21.2

1.1

Lung

11.0

13.7

0.8

Prostate

95.9

99.4

1.0

Pancreas

3.2

5.4

0.6

Colon

55.5

66.3

0.8


Percent of Patients – Women (1996-2004)

Cancer

African American
Women

White Women

African
American/White Ratio

All Sites

54.9

67.7

0.8

Cervical

65.3

73.7

0.9

Pancreas

6.0

4.5

1.3

Colon

54.6

65.7

0.8

Breast

77.8

90.5

0.9

Source:  CDC, 2009. Health United States, 2008. Table 53
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus08.pdf [PDF | 12.2MB]

At a glance – Death Rate:

Cancer Death Rates per 100,000 – Men (2002-2006)

Cancer

African American
Men

Non-Hispanic White Men

African American/Non-Hispanic White Ratio

All Sites

304.2

231.8

1.3

Stomach

11.0

4.5

2.4

Lung

90.1

72.9

1.2

Prostate

56.3

23.7

2.4

Pancreas

15.4

12.4

1.3

Colon & Rectum

31.4

21.7

1.4

Cancer Death Rates per 100,000 – Women (2002-2006)

Cancer

African American
Women

Non-Hispanic White Women

African American/Non-Hispanic White Ratio

All Sites

183.7

161.2

1.1

Stomach

5.3

2.2

2.4

Cervical

4.6

2.1

2.2

Pancreas

12.4

9.2

1.3

Colon and Rectum

21.6

15.1

1.4

Breast

33.0

24.5

1.3

Source:  NCI 2009.  Seer Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2006.  Table 1.20.
http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2006/results_single/sect_01_table.20_2pgs.pdf [PDF | 24KB]

At a Glance – Screening:

Breast Cancer

Percent of women age 40 and over who had a mammogram within the past 2 years, 2005(age-adjusted)

Non-Hispanic Black Women

Non-Hispanic White Women

Non-Hispanic Black/Non-Hispanic White Ratio

64.7

68.2

0.9

Source:   2007 National Healthcare Disparities Report. Table 1A_b.
http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/nhdr07/index.html

Cervical Cancer

Percent of women age 18 and over who had a Pap smear within the past 3 years, 2005 (age-adjusted)

Non-Hispanic Black Women

Non-Hispanic White Women

Non-Hispanic Black/Non-Hispanic White Ratio

80.2

79.1

1.0

Source:   2007 National Healthcare Disparities Report. Table 3b.
http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/nhdr07/index.html

Colon Cancer

Adults age 50 and over who reported they ever had a colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, or proctoscopy, or had a fecal occult blood test within the past 2 years, United States, 2005

Non-Hispanic Black

Non-Hispanic White

Non-Hispanic Black/Non-Hispanic White Ratio

48.5

58.5

0.8

Source:   2008 National Healthcare Disparities Report. Table 1_3_1.2b.

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Guru Dies Of Cancer-Related Illness

The Poor Misunderstood Egg

An egg yolk surrounded by the egg white
Image via Wikipedia

The Poor Misunderstood Egg

Let me be perfectly clear: Eggs are one of the most perfect foods on the planet. I eat a lot of eggs and my cholesterol is way low…even a little too low, but that’s another story. I’m a big egg white fan but should I omit the yolk?

Yup, the yolk — that poor, misunderstood, but essential component of the egg that too often gets thrown out in a misguided attempt to avoid cholesterol and fat. So let’s clear a few things up about eggs, cholesterol, fat and health.

Number One: The cholesterol in eggs has virtually no effect on the cholesterol in your blood.

Number Two: The fat in the egg yolk is mostly monounsaturated fat, the same kind found in olive oil. Yes, you heard that right. Of the 5.3 grams of total fat in one large egg, only 1.6 grams are saturated.

Number Three: Many of the nutrients that make eggs so incredibly healthy are found in the yolk. Examples: Lutein and zeaxanthin, two members of the carotenoid family that are beneficial for eye health. The yolk also contains choline, which is important for brain health — and vitamin D.

The idea that eating eggs is bad for your heart is a myth. No study has linked egg eating to greater risk of heart disease. In fact, quite the opposite. According to an article from Harvard Health (a publication of Harvard Medical School), “The only large study to look at the impact of egg consumption on heart disease … found no connection between the two.”

Research has also shown that eggs eaten at the start of the day can reduce your daily calorie intake, prevent snacking between meals and keep you satisfied.

However, not all eggs are created equal. Stay away from scrambled eggs at open buffets. While the cholesterol in eggs poses no real harm to you, when that cholesterol is “scrambled” and then exposed to air and oxygen for a long time (like on an open buffet), it becomes damaged. That’s not something you really want in your body. Better to poach, soft or hard boil. If you do scramble eggs, eat them quickly and don’t let them sit around all day long.

source: unknown

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Do Black Men Encourage Black Women To Be Overweight?

These words can be heard from just about every man of color from time to time. “I want something I can hold on to”.. Was Sir Mix A Lot speaking for all black men whe he spoke of his preference for a women with a large behind? Has the desire of black men to have a women with a nice apple bottom behind led to the obesity rate in black women. Read more

KFC’s new Double Down is Fast Trip to a Double By Pass

Sixty percent of a day’s maximum sodium intake, half a day’s ration of saturated fat, as many calories as a Big Mac: That’s KFC’s new, $5 Double Down sandwich, this week in shops nationwide. A pair of chicken patties, no bun, encase bacon, cheese and sauce.

As reported by the Huffington Post last August, the sandwich was initially made available in two test markets — Rhode Island and Nebraska. KFC’s Double Down gamble paid off, and they’re rolling out the creation nationwide starting on April 12. Their decision was first announced on April 1, leading some to believe it was an April Fools’ joke. Turns out, the only gag involved was the reaction of vegans.

If you’re itchin’ for this chicken, there’s a countdown clock on KFC’s website, along with some surprising nutritional news. The grilled version has “only” 460 calories and 23 grams of fat, while the original recipe version has 540 calories and 32 grams of fat. That’s nowhere near some early speculation in the Vancouver Sun that one sandwich might set you back 1228 calories. Still, it might be wise to run a few extra laps before crossing the road for this chicken.

Seriously I’m not sure I’d even do this on a cheat day…it would leave me K.O.’d for the rest of the day. You’ve been warned!

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Jennifer Hudson is Weight Watchers' newest spokesperson

 Grammy and Academy Award winner Jennifer Hudson is now speaking up about losing. Weight, that is.

The actress and new mom has signed on as the new spokeswoman for Weight Watchers, and plans are underway for her to share her dieting experiences, according to the weight loss company.

The actress, who tried several diets before starting the program, has already lost some weight, her Weight Watchers leader Liz Josefsberg tells the Daily News.

Josefsberg wouldn’t say how many pounds the actress has lost so far, but said that she recently reached a major weight loss milestone.

“We aren’t talking numbers, but Jennifer is extremely close to another weight loss goal of hers,” Josefsberg said. “She’s excited.”

On the Weight Watchers Web site, Hudson noted, “With Weight Watchers I am enjoying the weight loss because I’m doing it the right way – I feel empowered with what I’ve learned, everything from portion control to what foods will help keep me satisfied. It’s a lifestyle change, not a diet.”

The actress has planned a live Facebook interview at 3 p.m. Thursday on Weight Watchers’ Facebook page.

Since embarking on the weight loss program several months ago, Hudson has bumped up her exercise routine, graduating from just walking to walk-running and playing basketball, Josefsberg says.

She also following another tried-and-true Weight Watchers tactic: keeping track of everything she eats.

“Jennifer tracks what she eats with her Weight Watchers iPhone app,” Josefsberg said. “She’s on the go so much that she doesn’t always have time to pop open her laptop, but whenever she eats something, she enters it on her phone and that calculates how many points she has left for the day.”

On the program, different foods are “worth” a certain number of points, and each Weight Watchers participant is allotted a certain amount of points to eat each day.

One of Hudson’s pitfalls before she started the program was focusing on foods she thought would help her lose weight, Josefsberg said.

“A lot of grilled chicken is how Jennifer puts it,” she said.

Weight Watchers encourages attendance at weekly support meetings, and Hudson has been to some of them, Josefsberg said.

“We also have private meetings and do what we can,” she said. “We have had to meet at airports sometimes. With her schedule, it’s just not possible for her to always get to a meeting.”

Hudson’s not the only celeb to be the face of Weight Watchers.

Last year, Jenny McCarthy was a Weight Watchers spokeswoman. Until then, the most recognizable spokesperson for the organization was Sarah Ferguson

source: nydailynews.com